1. Home
  2. Lab Reports
  3. How to read your CoA?

How to read your CoA?

Overview

Laboratory reports are commonly referred to as “Certificates of Analysis” or “CoA’s” for short. A CoA is an authenticated document that presents the analytical results of a specific test on a product batch/lot. These documents are issued by Botanacor’s Quality Assurance department.

We designed our CoA’s to be minimalistic and easy to comprehend, whether you’re a manufacturer, government official, or consumer. Our certificates of analysis have three main components:

  • Sample Information
  • Test Information
  • Final Approval

Sample Information

The Sample Information section provides details about the sample, the type of product submitted, and the test method used.

Sample Name – This is the name of the sample that was provided by the client on our Chain of Custody form.

Batch ID – The Batch ID is provided by the client for internal tracking or GMP requirements.

Reported – The date the Certificate of Analysis was reported to the client. The date format will be DD-MMM-YYYY, for example 01-Jan-2020.

Type – The Type refers to the matrix of the sample that was submitted. The categories are: plant, concentrate, solution, or unit.

Test – This field will list the type of test that was performed, e.g. Potency, Terpenes, etc.

Test ID – The Test ID is a unique identifier for the sample and a requirement for ISO 17025.

Method – Each of our testing methods has a number that links to our SOPs. For example, “TM14” is our Cannabinoid Potency method. This number is also listed on our Scope of Accreditation for ISO 17025.

Test Information

The second section of our Certificate of Analysis will contain the data for the type of test that we performed.

  • Cannabinoid Potency
  • Terpene Profile Analysis
  • Residual Solvent Analysis
  • Microbial Contamination
  • Pesticides
  • Heavy Metals

Cannabinoid Potency

Donut Chart – This chart displays several data points. The donut ring will display each cannabinoid reported. Inside the donut we provide either the total cannabinoids reported in a percentage or for finished products, it will report the total milligrams of CBD.

Bar Chart – The bar chart is mainly for compliance purposes. It presents delta-9 THC, THCA, CBD, and CBDA.

LOQ – LOQ means, “Limit of Quantitation”. This is the lowest level that we can accurately quantitate (or count) for each analyte that we report. The LOQ varies from sample to sample based on the weight and the dilution factor used for testing.

Result (%) – This column displays the analyte reported in a percentage format.

Result (mg/g) – This column displays the analyte reported in a milligram per gram amount.

Result (mg/mL) – When provided the density of the sample, we can display results in milligrams per milliliter.

Total Cannabinoids – The total cannabinoids section will display two values, Total “Potential” THC, and Total “Potential” CBD. This contains the theoretical conversion of THCA into delta-9 THC and CBDA into CBD.

To calculate the total potential for each, use the following equations:

[delta-9 THC] + [(THCA * 0.877)] = Total Potential THC
[CBD] + [(CBDA * 0.877)] = Total Potential CBD

Terpene Profile Analysis

Donut Chart – This chart visually displays each terpene reported and inside the donut chart will be the total terpenes reported in a percentage.

Bar Chart – The bar chart will list the 10 predominant terpenes.

LOQ – LOQ means, “Limit of Quantitation”. This is the lowest level that we can accurately quantitate (or count) for each analyte that we report. The LOQ varies from sample to sample based on the weight and the dilution factor used for testing.

Result (%) – This column displays the analyte reported in a percentage format.

Result (mg/g) – This column displays the analyte reported in a milligram per gram amount.

Residual Solvent Analysis

Reportable Range – Each solvent that we test has an upper and lower range of detection that is reported in ppm or parts per million.

ppm – Parts per million. The unit of measure for residual solvent analysis.

Microbial Contamination

CFU – Colony Forming Unit. The unit of measure for microbial contamination testing.

Q: How do I read my results?
A: We report microbial results in colony forming units per gram (CFU/g). The result is reported using scientific notation.

Examples:
10^2 = 100 CFU
10^3 = 1,000 CFU
10^4 = 10,000 CFU
10^5 = 100,000 CFU

Sample results:
1.3 x 10^4 = 13,000 CFU
2.2 x 10^5 = 220,000 CFU

Q: What is a safe limit of microbials?
A: Each state/country will have guidance on what is considered a safe limit of microbials. It is best to consult your state/country’s regulations to determine the allowable limit. The American Herbal Products Association (AHPA) has a document that provides guidance for allowable limits of microbials. [link]

Pesticides

We report pesticides in parts per billion (ppb).

PPB – parts per billion

Limit of Detection – 50 – 2500

Q: What is a safe limit?
A: Each state/country will have guidance on what is considered a safe limit of pesticides. It is best to consult your state/country’s regulations to determine the allowable limit.

Heavy Metals

We report heavy metals results in parts per million (ppm). Some laboratories will report in micrograms (μg.)

PPM – Parts per million.

Reporting limit – 0.01ppm

Q: What is a safe limit?
A: Each state/country will have guidance on what is considered a safe limit of heavy metals. It is best to consult your state/country’s regulations to determine the allowable limit. The American Herbal Products Association (AHPA) has a document that provides guidance for California’s Prop 65. Heavy Metals guidance is on page 10. [link]

Final Approval

The third section of our Certificate of Analysis is the Final Approval.

Prepared by/Date – The signature and name of the analyst that performed the test.

Approved by/Date – The signature and name of the quality assurance analyst that reviewed the test data.


Updated on May 13, 2020

Was this article helpful?

Related Articles